SBS PATIENTS LACK A GI TRACT THAT IS ABLE TO SUFFICIENTLY ABSORB NUTRIENTS

Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) is a malabsorption disorder, mainly caused by a decrease in length or functionality of the small intestine. It occurs mostly in infants who have undergone a bowel resection due to intestinal failure complications such as necrotizing enterocolitis, gastroschisis, and atresia.

Patients undergoing surgical intervention end up with Short Bowel etiology. Their quality of life and ability to take in nutrition after surgery depends on the amount of intestine removed and the adaptability of the remaining intestine. Regardless, in the lengthy recovery period following surgery, these patients are dependent on parenteral nutrition and can remain so for months or years afterwards.

TREATING SBS IN INFANTS IS A CHALLENGE

THERE IS CURRENTLY NO APPROVED TREATMENT FOR SBS IN NEWBORNS

Currently, the treatment strategy for SBS in infants consists of nutritional and pharmacological interventions. These aim to help the patient to increase enteral nutrition until reaching enteral autonomy, while minimizing the complications associated with the parenteral nutrition (PN) required after surgery.

Prolonged parenteral nutrition administration can result in systemic inflammatory responses, intestinal villous atrophy, and liver disease.

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NTRA-9620: GIVING SBS INFANTS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR FASTER RECOVERY AND BETTER GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

GI REHABILITATION AND ADAPTATION FOR INFANTS WITH SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME (SBS)
sleeping baby

Nutrinia’s drug in development, NTRA-9620, will enhance post-resection bowel adaptation, promoting increased enteral nutrition capacity and minimizing the need for parenteral nutrition. The initial patient population for NTRA-9620 is post-resection infants with SBS.

In clinical trials, NTRA-9620 has reduced dependency on parenteral nutrition, improved enteral capacity, supported better growth and development, and improved liver function.